Tn. Highway Patrol, and Ga. State Patrol Offer Highway Emergency Safety Tips

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CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (WDEF) — One woman died after getting hit on the Interstate Tuesday night.

It’s the second fatality along the the I-75 corridor since last week.

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The latest happened south of Carbondale Road.

Stopping along a busy interstate with huge trucks moving at 70 miles per hour only inches away, is a dangerous proposition if you’ve broken down.

Tennessee Highway Patrol Lt. John Harmon, says it’s best to avoid it altogether, if possible.



Lt. John Harmon with the Tennessee Highway Patrol, said, “If your vehicle will reach an exit ramp, get to an exit ramp and get off to a local convenience store, or somewhere safe or a welcome center or rest area.”

Lt. Harmon says it’s a good idea to call for help.

“What we want you to do, is call Star- 847, or call 911 if you need emergency services when you’ve broken down,” said Lt. Harmon.

Georgia State Patrol Sgt. Jason Buckner, has some basic advice for pulling over on the interstate.

“If you’re driving down the interstate and your vehicle happens to have problems, or you need to pull over for any reason, to use a cell phone, or something’s going on inside the car, it’s highly recommended you always pull to the right shoulder, and always pull as far as you can on the right shoulder,” said Sgt. Jason Buckner, with the Georgia State Patrol.

Sgt. Buckner says, if you do need to use the emergency lane, pull as far to the right as possible with the wheels well into the grass, to give yourself as much space as possible to enter and exit the vehicle.

“If you have to get out of the vehicle, try to stay on the passenger side of the vehicle, turn on emergency flashers, wear any reflective clothing that you may have in the car, if it’s nighttime, you may want to have a flashlight or somebody using a flashlight to alert traffic that’s coming up on you,” said Sgt. Buckner.

And for motorists who aren’t having emergencies, remember the Pull Over Law also applies to civilians in the emergency lane.

“When you see a stranded motorist or a car on the right shoulder, if you can, slow down and move over the the left lane if you can to allow them to fix their problem safely,” said Lt. Harmon.