Senior Matters: Soddy Daisy Seniors Share Words of Wisdom

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SODDY DAISY, Tenn. (WDEF) — Senior Citizens have a lot of life-experiences to look back on.

Some were good, others painful, but we all learn as we grow older.
What little bits of wisdom would they like to pass along to children, grandchildren and anyone who may benefit?

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One of the most active Senior Centers in the area is in Soddy-Daisy. It’s spacious, well supplied, and is the daily home to more than 200 active members.
Their backgrounds are as varied as their jobs were back in the day.
But, if you’ll take time to listen carefully, you’ll find a lot of wisdom in their words.

Our question to them is: what would you like to tell young people and those who are coming behind them?

Walter Van Dusen was a jack of all trades; carpenter, mechanic, you name it. He was raised in a foster home.



“Being in that Godless alcoholic home was devastating. But, the thing of it is..in a foster home, I learned what is the right way to go. And by that, I mean simply and I wish young people to know that…when we give our life to the LOrd, we live for the Lord..we don’t face a lot of the stuff that’s out there today,” said Walter Van Dusen.

Margaret Stackhouse is a member, but she is also the art teacher here at the Soddy Daisy Senior Center.

Margaret Stackhouse, from Ontario Canada said, “What I’ve learned is life is short, never take anything for granted, and your parents, once they’re gone, they’re gone. Don’t forget, you’ve got parents out there and they need to be busy, too. They need to have that mental stimulation.”

“Well, one thing, they need to have more respect for the elderly. I always tried to teach my kids and grand kids.,..that they need to listen a little bit longer and pay attention,” said Frances Sue Ayers, who is still working, at 83.

Ken Williams said, “I would say this. A person here, we don’t swear, the people here have good attitudes, and they do attend the Bible classes. Senior Citizens, they get help from the good lord. That’s the best thing.”

“Well, I’ve learned . . . I’m 72 years old, been retired for 5 years, if you be good to people your entire life, every opportunity you receive, it will make you live a lot longer and a lot happier,” said Jerry Knight, retired truck driver.

Leon Shattuck, brother of former Criminal Court Judge Clarence Shattuck, is a pretty good poker player. He goes to Las Vegas where he plays in the World Series of Poker.

“God don’t give everybody the same in mental ability. But you only have to deal what you’ve got. Life is short. I’m 78 year old, and its gone by mighty fast, very quickly. But I’ve enjoyed it,” said Leon Shattuck, a retired barber.

Wisdom from your elders.