Georgia Joins Tennessee in Setting New Record for Early Voting

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Georgia voters set new records for early voting in the Super Tuesday election.
The secretary of state says interest is higher than in the 2008 presidential preference primary.
We spoke with Secretary Brian Kemp as he visited the main polling station in Whitfield county.

As voters in Dalton turned out to register before tomorrow’s deadline, the Georgia Secretary of State was touring polling places in the northwest corner of Georgia and announcing that the early turnout is a record. At news time 276-thousand-704 people had been to the polls.

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BRIAN KEMP, GEORGIA SECRETARY OF STATE “The previous record was 271-thousand-418 votes…really in an historic election in 2008. And in that 2008 election, the total percentage of voters that we had after election fay was a little over 45%. So, we’re very excited and hopeful that Georgians will turn out and help us break that record for this primary.”

Republicans are outpacing Democrats in the early voting.

BRIAN KEMP “We’ve had 171-thousand-917 people vote in the republican primary so far, and 104-thousand-499 that have voted in the democratic primary. ”



Kemp says the importance of Georgia to the candidates is obvious.

BRIAN KEMP “And just to name a few that we’ve had…we’ve had Bernie Sanders at Morehouse College drew over 4000-people–Trump had over 6000 Sunday, John Kasick’s Town Hall meeting, they were actually turning people away from his venue on Tuesday.”

Secretary Clinton will be in Atlanta Friday–Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz are coming Saturday.

It’s an especially eventful occasion for someone who is voting for the first time this year. Who impresses Romina Mendoza the most?

ROMINA MENDOZA. FIRST TIME VOTER “Well, they are all very interesting so just kind of have to think about it for awhile and really see how all the candidates want to better the country.”

Which is the most diplomatic answer any new voter can give.

Tennessee also set a record with 383-thousand, people casting ballots.
That’s 16 percent more than in 2008.

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